Carabao Songs with Sequels

Below is a list of Carabao songs* with sequels. Many of the pairs of songs are spaced quite far apart in time, such that even fans are often unaware that their favorite song from the classic period has a sequel.

I’ve included my own zero-to-three star ranking, so you can see how relatively important they are. A three-star song in the Top 100 of Carabao songs and is a very favorite song. A one-star song is “Nice!” A zero-star song is not in the top 25% of Carabao songs. It is no surprise that a three-star Carabao song would have a sequel, but it is somewhat surprising how often the sequel turns out to be as good the original song.

The first example may be the most striking example of this. The sequel ลูกลุงขี้เมา Luuk Lung Kee Mow (Child of the Drunken Uncle) was written for the 25th Anniversary of the band, which is 25 years after ลุงขี้เมา Lung Kee Mao (The Drunken Uncle) appeared as the first song on the first album. There is a “punch line” in the second song, linking to the first song, that is really powerful.

The 10 Tuk Kwai Tuey songs, are covered in a separate article. (Note that the song “Bua Loy” listed below as having a sequel, is also part 5 of the 10-part Tuk Kwai Tuey saga told in 10 songs spanning the first 10 Carabao albums.) The “Made In Thailand” sequels will be covered in a separate article.

ลุงขี้เมา Lung Kee Mao (The Drunken Uncle), in 1981 ✰✰✰
ลูกลุงขี้เมา Luuk Lung Kee Mow (Child of the Drunken Uncle), in 2007 ✰✰✰

หนุ่มสุพรรณ Num Suphan (Young Man from Suphan), in 1981 ✰✰✰
หนุ่มสุพรรณ 2 Num Suphan 2 (Young Man from Suphan 2), in 1988 ✰✰

วณิพก Wanipok (The Beggar), in 1983 ✰✰✰
ยายสำอาง Yaai Samang (Good-Looking Grandma), 1993 ✰✰✰ [Not officially a sequel, but seems like a sequel**]

ดือนเพ็ญ Duan Pen (Full Moon), in 1984 ✰✰✰
พลจันทร์เดือนเพ็ญ Polachan Duan Pen (Polachan’s [Song] “Full Moon”), in 1989 ✰✰✰
SEE ALSO: ชีวิตสัมพันธ์ Cheewit Sampat (Related Life), in 1987 ✰✰✰

ลูกหิน Luuk Hin (Stone Child), in 1984 ✰✰✰
ลูกแก้ว Luuk Geow (Glass Child), in 1984 ✰✰✰ [These two songs followed each other on the album Made in Thailand and are often played together in this order***]

หำเทียม Ham Tiam (Dildo), in 1984
หำเฮี้ยน Ham Hian (Ham is Strong Enough to Do It), in 1985

บัวลอย Bua Loy, in 1984 ✰✰✰
เห็นมั้ยบัวลอย Hen Mai Bua Loy? (Do You See This, Bua Loy?) in 2014 ✰✰✰

อเมริโกย Ameri-goy, in 1985 [The title is is a pun usually translated “Greedy Americans”] ✰✰✰
กัญชาคอมมิชชั่น Ganja Commission (Cannabis Commission), in 2019 ✰✰ NEW!! [Not an official sequel, but I strongly feel it is a sequel]

สืบทอดเจตนา Suep Tot Jaydtana (Carrying Out Suep’s Intentions), in 1990
คอริดอร์ Corridor, in 2006 [สืบทอดเจตนา 2 Suep Tot Jaydtana 2 (Carrying Out Suep’s Intentions 2)]

เพลงของกู Playng Kong Gu (My Song), in 2017 ✰✰
เพลงของกู เวอร์ชั่น 3 Playng Kong Gu Version 3 (My Song, Version 3), in 2017 ✰✰✰

*By Carabao song, I mean Carabao (the band) plus Add Carabao (solo) songs.
**Both songs are about a blind musician who roams around playing and begging for money [busking]. In the first song the person is fictional. In the second, she is real. The two songs are spaced a multiple of 5 years apart (10), as with some other songs with sequels, and they were selected as the two songs played during the 2nd Carabao jam session with Santana, in 2016.
***Like the Queen songs “We Will Rock You” and “We are the Champions.”

ถนนชีวิต Tanon Chewit (The Road of Life)

By ยืนยง โอภากุล Yuenyong Opakul
Album: แป๊ะขายขวด Bpae Kaai Kuat (1982)

Note: This old song seems to complaining about the bad traffic situation (probably in Bangkok). However a note under the official Carabao YouTube claims the song is metaphorical: Life is compared to a road; we hurry along it and forget to appreciate our surroundings. FYI: A song-taew is a large pick up truck with an awning over the back and two benches along both sides for picking up passengers. A tuk-tuk is a motorized tricycle that can fit 1 to 3 passengers in the back (in addition to the driver).

รีบตื่นกันไวไว ไม่ทันไปเข้าเรียนสาย
rêep dtèun gan wai wai mâi tan bpai kâo rian săai
Hurry and wake up! We’re running late to class
หลายครังอย่าหวังคะแนนดี
lăai krang yàa wăng ká-naen dee
Too many times [late] and there’s no hope for good grades
รีบตื่นกันไวไว ไม่ทันไปเข้างานสาย…
rêep dtèun gan wai wai mâi tan bpai kâo ngaan săai …
Hurry and wake up! We’re running late to work
หลายครั้งอย่าหวังเงินเดือนดี
lăai kráng yàa wăng ngern deuan dee
Too many times [late], and there’s no hope for a good salary

รถเมล์มีอยู่กี่สายคนก็มากมาย
rót may mee yòo gèe săai kon gôr mâak maai
However many bus lines are there, they are crowded with people
มีถนนอยู่กี่สายรถก็มากมี
mee tà-nŏn yòo gèe săai rót gôr mâak mee
However many roads there are, they are crowded with vehicles.
บนถนนทุกๆ สาย ดูมันวุ่นวาย
bon tà-nŏn túk túk săai doo man wûn waai
On every road, it looks so chaotic.
ทําอย่างไรจะไปทันทํางาน
tam yàang rai jà bpai tan tam ngaan
What can I do to be on time for work?

เมื่อก่อนมีรถราง แล่นพลางก็ร้องพลาง
mêua gòn mee rót raang lâen plaang gôr róng plaang
Before we had a trolley. As it was gliding along it would sing*.
ฉันถึงที่ทํางานทันเวลา
chăn tĕung têe tam ngaan tan way-laa
I got to work on time
เดี๋ยวนี้มีรถเมล์ แล่นเฉไปเฉมา
dĭeow née mee rót may lâen chăy bpai chăy maa
Right now we have buses going along, swerving in and out
ว้า…ยังไม่ทันเวลางาน
wáa … yang mâi tan way-laa ngaan
Sigh . . . I’ll still be late to work

มีรถเมล์มีอยู่กี่สายคนก็มากมาย
mee rót may mee yòo gèe săai kon gôr mâak maai
However many bus lines there are, they are crowded with people.
มีถนนอยู่กี่สายรถมันมากมี
mee tà-nŏn yòo gèe săai rót man mâak mee
However many roads we have, they are crowded with vehicles.
บนถนนทุกๆ สาย ดูมันวุ่นวาย
bon tà-nŏn túk túk săai doo man wûn waai
On every road, it looks chaotic.
ทําอย่างไรจะไปทันโรงเรียน
tam yàang rai jà bpai tan rohng rian
How am I going to be on time for work?

มีรถเก๋งก็รีบไป มีรถเมล์ก็รีบไป
mee rót găyng gôr rêep bpai mee rót may gôr rêep bpai
There are cars rushing along. There are buses rushing along
รถแท็กซี่ก็รีบไป รถสองแถวก็รีบไป
rót táek-sêe gôr rêep bpai rót sŏng tăew gôr rêep bpai
Taxis also rush along. Song-taews also rush along.
รถตุ๊กๆ ก็รีบไป มอเตอร์ไซค์ก็รีบไป
rót dtúk dtúk gôr rêep bpai mor-dtêr-sai gôr rêep bpai
Tuk-tuks, also rush along. Motorcycles also rush along
รถสิบล้อก็รีบไป รถโดยสารก็รีบไป
rót sìp lór gôr rêep bpai rót doi săan gôr rêep bpai
Ten-wheeled trucks also rush along. Commuter vehicles rush along

รถเมล์มีอยู่กี่สายคนก็มากมาย
rót may mee yòo gèe săai kon gôr mâak maai
No matter how many bus lines there are, they are crowded with people
มีถนนอยู่กี่สายรถมันมากมี
mee tà-nŏn yòo gèe săai rót man mâak mee
No matter how many roads there are, they are crowded with vehicles.
บนถนนทุกๆ สายดูมันวุ่นวาย
bon tà-nŏn túk túk săai doo man wûn waai
On every road, it looks chaotic
ทําอย่างไรจะไปทันทํางาน
tam yàang rai jà bpai tan tam ngaan
How am I going to be on time for work?
ทําอย่างไรจะไปทันโรงเรียน
tam yàang rai jà bpai tan rohng rian
How am I going to be on time for school?

ขุดถนนก็ขุดไป กลบถนนก็กลบไป
kùt tà-nŏn gôr kùt bpai glòp tà-nŏn gôr glòp bpai
[If we need to] dig up the roads, do it! Cover the roads? Do it!**
ตัดถนนก็ตัดไป ซ่อมถนนก็ซ่อมไป
dtàt tà-nŏn gôr dtàt bpai sôm tà-nŏn gôr sôm bpai
Build new roads? Do it! Fix the roads? Do it!
นํ้าท่วมถนนก็สูบไป สร้างสะพานก็สร้างไป
nám tûam tà-nŏn gôr sòop bpai sâang sà-paan gôr sâang bpai
If the roads are flooded, go ahead and drain them! [If you need to] build a bridge, build it!

ขุดถนนก็ขุดไป กลบถนนก็กลบไป
kùt tà-nŏn gôr kùt bpai glòp tà-nŏn gôr glòp bpai
[If we need to] dig up the roads, do it! Cover the roads? Do it!**
ตัดถนนก็ตัดไป ซ่อมถนนก็ซ่อมไป
dtàt tà-nŏn gôr dtàt bpai sôm tà-nŏn gôr sôm bpai
Build new roads? Do it! Fix the roads? Do it!
นํ้าท่วมถนนก็สูบไป สร้างสะพานก็สร้างไป
nám tûam tà-nŏn gôr sòop bpai sâang sà-paan gôr sâang bpai
If the roads are flooded, go ahead and drain them! [If you need to] build a bridge, build it!

ขุดถนนก็ขุดไป กลบถนนก็กลบไป
kùt tà-nŏn gôr kùt bpai glòp tà-nŏn gôr glòp bpai
[If we need to] dig up the roads, do it! Cover the roads? Do it!**
ตัดถนนก็ตัดไป ซ่อมถนนก็ซ่อมไป
dtàt tà-nŏn gôr dtàt bpai sôm tà-nŏn gôr sôm bpai
Build new roads? Do it! Fix the roads? Do it!
นํ้าท่วมถนนก็สูบไป สร้างสะพานก็สร้างไป
nám tûam tà-nŏn gôr sòop bpai sâang sà-paan gôr sâang bpai
If the roads are flooded, go ahead and drain them! [If you need to] build a bridge, build it!

* It would “sing,” or possible “cry”. In any case, trolleys make a high screeching sound.
**They dig up the roads to get to the underground pipes.

Announcement: All Songs through “Made In Thailand” ALBUM Fixed by GREAT Translator

Last year, a highly-qualified translator who is a native Thai and is fluent in English volunteered to systematically check and suggest improvements for my translations of Carabao song lyrics. This is a huge project, and I thank this person (who wants to remain anonymous) from the bottom of my heart. I am thrilled to announce we have finished fixing the translations up through the album Made In Thailand.

You can now (as of Valentine’s Day 2020) read the translations of the early Carabao songs with confidence. I am happy to say, we didn’t have any changes that overturned the overall meaning of a song, but we did have at least three song translations that were radically improved. You might want to read their new translation and give these already fascinating songs a fresh listen:

Songs with radically improved translations:

Summer Hill

ท ทหารอดทน Taw Tahaan Ot Ton (The Persevering Soldier)

คนเก็บฟืน Kon Gep Feun [The Firewood Collector]

Some important details were uncovered in at least two songs

In กัมพูชา Kampucha (Cambodia) about the Cambodian genocide there is an already evocative line: “In the end, when the guns stop roaring and echoing/ a plaid cloth [a pakaoma],/ blown away by the wind, falls to the ground.” The new translator notes that a pakama is used to cover the bodies of dead people lying on the ground, thus it is understood by Thais that the pakama is blown by the wind to fall on a dead body.

In the last last line of “เดือนเพ็ญ Duan Pen (Full Moon)” a child who is away wants to return and nestle in the bosom of their mother. I thought it odd that the person, most likely a soldier, misses their mother more than anyone else, and guessed that the “mother” is Thailand itself. But the new translator points out that it is also possible that the person wants to return to their wife, often also called “mae” or “mother” by the husband.

A newly translated song

The song “หำเทียม Ham Tiam (Dildo)” could not have been translated at all without the help of this person. To give you a taste of the complexity, which I could not have sorted out if I studied Thai for the rest of my life, here are the notes explaining the title of the song:

“The man in this song’s story is named ‘Ham,’ which is in the Isaan dialect, can mean either a ‘lad” or ‘penis’ or ‘testicles.’ ‘Ham’ is a cute and friendly word for ‘penis,’ . . . The title of the song is หำเทียม (Ham Tiam), means ‘artificial penis’ or ‘dildo,’ but refers to the longer word หำ[ผสม]เทียม Ham [Pasom] Tiam, which means ‘artificial-mixing penis,’ or ‘artificial insemination,’ . . .”

A Legacy for Fans and Future Researchers

I started this project using the “Fake it ‘til you make it!” approach. I was translating relying heavily on Thai2English.com and on begging friends for help. Because I translated the best songs first, at a time when I could barely translate, the best songs were often the worst translated, while very obscure songs are now receiving relatively deluxe treatment. From the start, I got in-depth help from knowledgeable volunteers to whom I am forever grateful. However, some of my helpers were other Farang translators, meaning we will inevitably miss out on some of the idioms, references, and word play. Other helpers were Thais who are not official translators.

The new translator is able to “read between the lines” and guess when Add Carabao is using a word other than his first choice in order to rhyme. This person is able to interpret an idiom in which all the words of the standard idiom have been swapped out for new words. They can note that two lines that I had separated are actually connected. They can explain why one song advises one to “Be the moon” and “put copper rings on the hands of each child” (because Add is referring to a children’s lullaby which every Thai person knows).

The importance of the project (I want to leave it as a resource to Carabao, international fans of Carabao and to scholarly music ethnologists) means it deserves more than just my own best efforts and sporadic advice from others. The songs deserve solid translations that you can trust! Which you now have.

Lyrics Translations for the Band