A set of a similar songs across the first 4 albums: About the rice harvest and carts

I found a set of a similar songs across the first 4 albums—about the rice harvest and carts:

1) หนุ่มลำมูล Num Lam Mun (Young Man of Mun Riverway) by คมสันต์ ดวงสูงเนิน Khomsan Duangsungnoen and สุเทพ ถวัลย์วิวัฒนกุล Suthep Thawanwiwatthanakun, on the album: ขี้เมา Kee Mao (The Drunk) (1981)

2) ด่านเกวียน Dan Kwian, by Carabao [presumably; Wikipedia does not list an author for this song] on the album แป๊ะขายขวด Bpae Kaai Kuat (The Bottle Collector) (1982)

3) ล้อเกวียน Lor Gwian (Cart Wheel) by สีสัน ควงตะคองหลง Sisan Khuangtakhonglong, on the album วณิพก Wanipok (The Busker [Formerly, titled “The Beggar”]) (1983)

4) กลิ่นรวงทอง Glin Ruang Tong (The Scent of Golden Ears of Rice) by จิตร ภูมิศักดิ์ Chit Poomisak on the album ท ทหารอดทน Taw Tahaan Ot Ton (The Persevering Soldier) (1983)

The trail is broken at the album Made in Thailand, which has no similar song.

The first and fourth songs, หนุ่มลำมูล (Young Man of Mun Riverway) and กลิ่นรวงทอง Glin Ruang Tong (The Scent of Golden Ears of Rice), are beloved classics, written by คมสันต์ ดวงสูงเนิน Khomsan Duangsungnoen and จิตร ภูมิศักดิ์ Chit Poomisak, respectively, and only covered by Carabao. They are both about the rice harvest.

The second and third songs, ด่านเกวียน Dan Kwian by Carabao (presumabily) and ล้อเกวียน Lor Gwian (Cart Wheel) by สีสัน ควงตะคองหลง Sisan Khuangtakhonglong are extremely similar, both involving the word “cart” in the title and with a cart featuring prominently in the story of the song. “Dan Kwian” is a place name, so for that song title I didn’t translate it further but “เกวียน” (spelled “Kwian” in the English translation of the place name) is the exact same word “cart” as it in the title of ล้อเกวียน Lor Gwian (Cart Wheel). The song “Dan Kwian” is NOT about the rice harvest but about pottery making. Still it celebrates the low-income workers.

The best of the four songs, in my opinion, is the cover of กลิ่นรวงทอง Glin Ruang Tong (The Scent of Golden Ears of Rice), originally written by จิตร ภูมิศักดิ์ Chit Poomisak, who also wrote the wonderful classic แสงดาวแห่งศรัทธา “Starlight of Faith” or “Starlight of Confidence” (not a Carabao song–google it). This fourth song, although it doesn’t mention a cart, in the Carabao arrangement begins with a squeaky sound which reminds one of a cart.

If you listen to the four songs, you will find additional connections, in both style, substance, and metaphors used. I wonder if all four songs are connected in the minds of those who arranged them put them in the albums.